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A Passion for Hot Chocolate

Hot Chocolate

A Brief History of Hot Chocolate – And Top Variations to Try!

He took his own cocoa from the tray, which seemed provided with almost as many teapots as there were persons in company —

Miss Parker drinking one sort of herb tea and Miss Diana another — and turning completely to the fire, sat coddling and cooking it to his own satisfaction and toasting some slices of bread, brought up ready-prepared in the toast rack; and till it was all done, she heard nothing of his voice but the murmuring of a few broken sentences of self-approbation and success.

When his toils were over, however, he moved back his chair into as gallant a line as ever, and proved that he had not been working only for himself by his earnest invitation to her to take both cocoa and toast. She was already helped to tea — which surprised him, so totally self-engrossed had he been.

“l thought I should have been in time,” said he, “but cocoa takes a great deal of boiling.”

“l am much obliged to you,” replied Charlotte. “But I prefer tea.”

“Then l will help myself,” said he. “A large dish of rather weak cocoa every evening agrees with me better than anything.”

lt struck her, however, as he poured out this rather weak cocoa, that it came forth in a very fine, dark-coloured stream; and at the same moment, his sisters both crying out, “Oh, Arthur, you get your cocoa stronger and stronger every evening,” with Arthur’s somewhat conscious reply of “Tis rather stronger than it should be tonight”

Sanditon, by Jane Austen, 1817

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