Posted on

Negus

As Tom Musgrave was seen no more, we may suppose his plan to have succeeded, and imagine him mortifying with his barrel of oysters in dreary solitude, or gladly assisting the landlady in her bar to make fresh negus for the happy dancers above.
The Watsons

Negus, a beverage made of wine, hot water, lemon juice, sugar, and nutmeg was created by by colonel Francis Negus in the early 18th century. Though Col. Negus died in 1737, his namesake drink remained a popular fortifier on cold evenings. During the early Regency it was practically expected, along with White Soup at balls.

By Victorian times the drink, similar to Mulled Wine, had dropped from being fashionable to being considered a children’s drink. Jerry Thomas remarks in his 1862 book, How to Mix Drinks, that it is “A most refreshing and elegant beverage, particularly for those who do not take punch or grog after supper.”

To Make Negus
To every pint of port wine, allow 1 quart of boiling water, 1/4 lb. of sugar, 1 lemon, grated nutmeg to taste.

As this beverage is more usually drunk at children’s parties than at any other, the wine need not be very old or expensive for the purpose, a new fruity wine answering very well for it. Put the wine into a jug, rub some lumps of sugar (equal to 1/4 lb.) on the lemon-rind until all the yellow part

Want to read the full article?

Sign up for a free subscriber account.

Existing Users Log In
 Remember Me  
New User Registration
captcha
*Required field

Comments are closed.