And the Bride Wore... Posted on

And the Bride Wore…

Share this: The wedding was very much like other weddings, where the parties have no taste for finery or parade; and Mrs Elton, from the particulars detailed by her husband, thought it all extremely shabby, and very inferior to her own. — “Very little white satin, very few lace veils; a most pitiful business! — Selina would stare when she heard of it.” — But, in spite of these deficiencies, the wishes, the hopes, the confidence, the predictions of the small band of true friends who witnessed the ceremony, were fully answered in the perfect happiness of the union. Emma Wedding dresses weren’t always white. Until Queen Victoria wore a white gown for her wedding in 1840, brides chose gowns with a variety of colors. During the British Regency era, it was the custom for most middle-class and lower-class brides to wear their best gowns to their weddings and to wear them frequently afterwards, either to church or on special occasions. Long before the early 19th century, brides traditionally wore gowns in a variety of colors. Jane Austen’s mother, Cassandra Leigh, wore her red riding habit when she married Rev. George Austen in Bath in 1764. This practical decision allowed the young couple to leave immediately for the parsonage at Deane, their new home. Like so many brides, Leigh wore her gown on many subsequent occasions. Later she turned the outfit into a gardening gown, and eventually recycled the fabric, creating a hunting jacket for her nine-year-old son Francis. This

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