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Jane Austen News – Issue 166

What’s the Jane Austen News this week? 


  The Best of Dame Emma Thompson

Emma Thompson with Anthony Hopkins in The Remains of the Day

In issue 163 of the Jane Austen News we looked at a list of the top Dame Judi Dench films. Well this week we were once again intrigued by a list ranking the best films by one of our favourite actresses – Dame Emma Thompson.

Andrew Pulver’s list of the top ten Thompson films was as follows:

10. Love Actually (2003) 

We loved this film. Emma Thompson’s character is utterly relatable and entirely endearing. But unlike in Sense and Sensibility (which we’ll come to later), Alan Rickman who stars opposite her isn’t the honest Colonel Brandon who Emma’s Elinor Dashwood sees her as the knight in shining armour for her sister Marianne, but rather plays Emma’s husband with a wandering eye and the ability to break her heart. If you haven’t seen it before, definitely watch this film and be prepared to cry buckets when that necklace-CD mix up takes place.

9. Junior (1994) 

We had completely forgotten about this one! Arnold Schwarzenegger isn’t who we’d typically pair with Emma Thompson, but it did seem to work…

8. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban/Order of the Phoenix/Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (2004/2007/2011) 

In the Harry Potter series we see Emma Thompson and Alan Rickman on set together again (it’s surprising how many films they both star in). This time we see Emma playing the wonderfully weird Professor Sybil Trelawney with style and some of the most gawky Coke-bottle glasses we’ve ever seen.

7. In the Name of the Father (1993)

“Emma Thompson shows inner steel playing the radical lawyer Gareth Peirce.” We can’t add much to this assessment as we’ve not seen it ourselves.

6. The Children Act (2017)

Emma Thompson plays a judge in this adaptation of Ian McEwan’s recently recently novel of the same name. She’s the ideal combination of incredibly intelligent and emotionally susceptible.

5. The Tall Guy (1989) 

Apparently this has a classic “furniture-smashing, milk-carton-rolling sex scene” in it. Again, we wouldn’t know, as we haven’t seen it.

4. The Legend of Barney Thomson (2015)

“Thompson is totally unrecognisable and completely fantastic as Barney’s mum: a cigarette-chugging chip hooverer, swathed in fake fur and prosthetic jowls. Worth seeking out for her alone.”

3. The Remains of the Day (1993)

Thompson plays Miss Kenton, the slightly less repressed of the two head servants in a pre-war English mansion. Her Miss Kenton to Anthony Hopkins’ Stevens is a sight to behold.

2. Howards End (1992)

This film saw Emma Thompson win her first Oscar for her portrayal of Margaret Schlegel. When it comes to Period Dramas, Emma is truly a master.

1. Sense and Sensibility (1995)

Well this had to be at number one didn’t it? As well as starring in the film as Elinor Dashwood, Emma wrote the script for the film (and some highly entertaining diaries documenting the filming process). In the eyes of the Jane Austen News, she will always be one of the great champions of Jane Austen’s works.

Also, if you haven’t seen the acceptance speech which she made when collecting her Golden Globe for her screenplay for Sense and Sensibility, it’s a delight:

 

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Jane Austen News – Issue 165

The Jane Austen News for May 8th

What’s the Jane Austen News this week? 


  The Biggest Bookcase Ever?

One street artist has taken his love for literature to the extreme by creating an enormous bookcase mural in the Dutch city of Utrecht. Boekenkast (the Dutch word for bookcase) is the creation of local artist Jan Is De Man, and can perhaps best be described as a giant optical illusion – featuring humongous books complete with intricate details.

The project began when Jan was asked to paint something to improve the overall vibe of the neighbourhood. To choose which titles would be included Jan toured the neighbourhood to ask locals for their favourite reads for inspiration.

Titles featured on Boekenkast range from classics like Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice (a fact which we love!), to newer additions like Mark Manson’s The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck. Incredibly, the books on show span eight different languages!

When we came across the images we felt we simply had to include it in this week’s Jane Austen News.

The Jane Austen News loves this art work!
Can you spot the spine of Pride and Prejudice?
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A Jane Austen Essay – Austen’s Intentional Deprivation of Matriarchy

Emma features prominently in this Jane Austen Essay
A Jane Austen Essay by Mark Massaro, M.A.

Through the absence, or the duplicity, of mother figures, Jane Austen presents the perceived illusion of matriarchy within the Regency culture.

During her lifetime in England, patriarchy dictated the treatment of wealth, the home, the government, and relationships, which suppressed the leadership role of females.

Emma Woodhouse quickly became the lady of the house.

While Austen’s novels deal with these issues, the absence of strong and positive maternal figures highlights the muting of that designation. Those characteristics was usually reserved for the protagonists. Supporting characters, like Lady Catherine in Pride and Prejudice, Fanny Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility, and Mrs. Allen in Northanger Abbey, actively contribute to undermine the conventional role of mothers as moral and spiritual guides through ignorance, manipulation, or selfishness. Deceased characters also affect the actions of the present day, through the mystery of Mrs. Tilney’s death in Northanger Abbey, as well as the absence of Mrs. Woodhouse in Emma. Austen uses these maternal characters to highlight social prejudices that contribute to creating these tropes by using irony and humor, and how an unjust system is in place to continuously silence strength in female leadership. By depriving the protagonists of mothers, a void is left that allows an interruption from matriarchal legacy by having the female protagonists subtly challenge older men in power.

The traditional women of this era were completely reliant on their male relatives, or through their own marriage, and this dependence not only supported the patriarchal society but was created by it in the first place. In Pride and Prejudice, Charlotte says, “Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance” (61). Women’s social, economic, and financial safety was based on their relationships to men, a condition which provided and maintained the foundation for this culture and, because of this, females were cast in a subordinate role. Educations relied entirely on perfecting their social roles. Austen’s protagonists often gain insights and experience as they learn from situations outside of their prescribed schoolings, which Austen tends to reward with true love or self-awareness. The mother roles that do exist within Austen’s world seem to contribute to maintaining this patriarchy as they sometimes become obstacles for the protagonists to deal with directly.

The Jane Austen News includes a Judi Dench film-off!Lady Catherine, in Pride and Prejudice, is the extreme of maintaining the patriarchy, as well as embodying an illusion of matriarchy. While she is viewed as an antagonist, she is simply a product of her system, which could be viewed as tragic. She is first introduced as the widow of Sir Lewis de Bourgh, which defines her as her marriage connection. Considering Darcy, her nephew, she is under the assumption that she is “entitled to know all his dearest concerns,” while, in reality, she does not (355). Her assumption of control, or of possessing an influential role of her nephew’s personal decisions, presents this illusion of matriarchy. Lady Catherine becomes an obstacle for Elizabeth to circumvent. Elizabeth is disrupting the old or traditional social order through her and Darcy’s deviation from his intended match, and Lady Catherine becomes agitated with this expression of freedom from cultural conditioning. Elizabeth directly presents Lady Catherine’s lack of power when she states that, according to Lady Catherine, their marriage has been “declared to be impossible” yet Lady Catherine has journeyed there to ask if there is an engagement (355). Elizabeth, in a sense, effectively exposes Lady Catherine’s own perceived power through circumventing each question by answering with a new question or answering drolly. Elizabeth states, “that if he (Darcy) is so, you can have no reason to suppose he will make an offer to me,” and Lady Catherine “hesitated for a moment” (355). This scene effectively presents how Elizabeth has power over a matriarch due to the latter’s fabricated sense of power. The new generation is usurping the past generations necessity for tradition.

A shadow-self of Lady Catherine is Fanny Dashwood, in Sense and Sensibility. Fanny’s perceived power is by proxy through the manipulation of her husband, John Dashwood. While she lacks power, she acts as a puppeteer, swaying her husband through careful wordplay and timing by manipulating the established gender roles. This reduces John, who embodies power because he is male and landowning, to a weak instrument for his wife’s selfish motivations. Fanny also contributes to maintaining the system by actively using it for her selfish ends. The article, “Women Owning Property: The Great Lady in Jane Austen,” written by Rita Dashwood, states that,

In contrast to the way Georgian genteel women have been represented by scholars of the period, the great ladies in Jane Austen are not portrayed as either creators of spaces, managers of their property, or socially conscientious members of their community. Instead, they share various negative characteristics, with most of them being described as despotic and arrogant. (107)

Again, like Lady Catherine, Fanny is a product of the society in which she was born. To make matters worse, Fanny contributes to it, solidifying the foundation of patriarchy, which is a shame because her manipulations are calculated and intelligent. This begs the question as to why social maneuvering and spousal manipulation became a trademark within Austen’s characters. Emma, in Emma, seems to have barely avoided this fate through gradual self-awareness and witnessing of relational consequences, though she never actually had any obstacle to overcome, besides herself. Men, possessing a societal freedom when in control of wealth, are also a product of their society, yet are less tragic. The circumstance of being a white male with wealth allows them to possess societal freedom and individual choice by way of a prescribed path without having to succumb to arrogance or selfish acts for survival. Darcy, Edward Ferrars, Capt. Wentworth, and Henry Tilney are examples of this concept, despite the origin of their finances being vastly different. Money becomes the determining factor, defining the foundation of relations, the authenticity of character, and choice of romantic prospects. The anxieties of acquiring a tarnished reputation or prohibited from inheritance are never a factor for these men because the society operates in their favor. These men are allowed to retain their honesty and sensibility and never succumb to desperate acts in order to survive.

The absence of a matriarchically order can showcase more than having one to deconstruct. When a maternal figure is lacking, a void becomes louder than an actual presence. Emma’s mother, though deceased, still influences events throughout the present day. Her maternal influence was her governess Miss Taylor, who, although caring, can still be considered hired help. Emma had economic and social power over her own maternal figure, which lead to Emma being ‘slightly’ spoiled and “the power of having rather too much her own way,” due to the fact that she had “been mistress of his house from a very early period” (1). Emma is thrust into a powerful role at such a young age created in her the illusion of matriarchy. This is also evident in her reliance on the class system when marriage was being considered between two parties. Emma’s relationships are based entirely on her status and not because of who she is as a person. In the beginning, Emma thwarts Mr. Martin and Harriet’s pairing because a rebellion against the patriarchal foundation was needed for it to commence. Austen complicates the established foundation by rewarding risk taking with relations. Kathleen Dougherty, the author of “Marriage and Friendship in Jane Austen: Self-knowledge, Virtue, and the “Second Self”,” claims that, “In Austen’s world, those who choose well choose for virtue and compatibility, not merely status or security. And a seeming lack of status can even be overcome if one’s character is thought to be good enough” (Dougherty 54). Through Emma’s trials, with her own self the obstacle, she creates a moral system which is removed from the patriarchic foundation. The absorption of her mother’s role within the society has evolved with Emma’s winning battle over her own conditioning. Her true character overwhelms the societal illusion.

Austen’s absent mothers subtly undermine male authority. They are not partaking in it whatsoever. The void causes a vacuum for creating unlimited potential within the heroines, something that the patriarchy would be threatened by. Despite there being a loss, it allows the opportunity for social shifting. Emma is the epitome of this. Frances L. Restuccia’ article, “A Black Morning: Kristevan Melancholia in Jane Austen’s Emma,” discusses this, as Restuccia writes, “Emma begins by offering a glimpse of the abyss–sustained throughout the novel by the accumulation of lost, dead, and dying mothers–for which it attempts to provide compensation.” Emma has social luxuries and engages with the members of her community as if they were puppets. More importantly, she influences them and this freedom and control occurs after she is the only female living in Hartfield. Her father is considered impotent by social standards, with being designated as feeble and nervous, much akin to an infant baby. His greatest actions are merely walking the grounds or entertaining guests. Emma has no paternal influence over her, allowing her to flourish as an individual with power. She has freedom because she has personal choice. Knightly reinforces Emma to conform to the Regency’s social standards with his moving into Hartfield, establishing a dominant male presence within the home.

We see Mrs Allen ‘guide’ Catherine far more in Northanger Abbey than Catherine’s mother does.

Despite the absent mother remaining present within the story, Austen also uses them as a literary technique to highlight character traits with the mystery surrounding the death of Mrs. Tilney in Northanger Abbey. Catherine Morland, the youngest heroine, has several women in the position of matriarchy. Mrs. Allen is the obvious choice as she is the one to support her entrance into the social world. Mrs. Allen shares with her the societal rules, as Austen writes, “she was admirably fitted to introduce a young lady into public, being as fond of going everywhere and seeing everything herself as any young lady could be. Dress was her passion. She had a most harmless delight in being fine” (10). Mrs. Allen represents this false authority and Austen categorizes her as a woman, “whose society can raise no other emotion than surprise at there being any men in the world who could like them well enough to marry them” (10).  Mrs. Allen’s presence is presented as superficial and playful due to Austen using sarcasm her description of Catherine’s chaperone in view of society. Mrs. Allen’s greatest power is her ability to camouflage herself within her social structure, which lessens her illusion of power even more than the others. Nothing about her is special and her individuality, and power, is drowned under the weight of maintaining the patriarchal order. An impressionable girl like Catherine would gravitate toward a force that stands out of a crowd.

Learning about the death of Mrs. Tilney allows Catherine to formulate her own perspective, and version, of events that occurred before her connection with the Tilney family. Another void is opened and it allows Catherine to momentarily escape the Georgian society. Catherine delves into a fictional world where the monsters are defined by their murderous actions instead of their inability to recognize power in matriarchy. Mrs. Tilney’s absence elevates her into becoming something more than another Mrs. Allen, who is merely existing within the society. The search for answers about Mrs. Tilney’s death mirrors a yearning for a mother figure. Catherine is passionate about learning more. Austen writes, “Catherine had never heard Mrs. Tilney mentioned in the family before, and the interest excited by this tender remembrance showed itself directly in her altered countenance, and in the attentive pause with which she waited for something more” (131). Catherine is temporarily elevated away from patriarchy as well, and she becomes a heroine within a story that will lead to adventure, discovery, power, and an ability to self-govern, something that her actual society denies her. The absence of Mrs. Tinley allows this flight of fancy to occur, something that Mrs. Allen or her own mother would be unable to do. This allows Catherine to actively engage with General Tilney, circumventing safeguards like matriarchal figures.

Austen’s heroines need a minor escape from the patriarchal structure to realize the individual power that exists outside of domineering men and complacent women. In Austen’s world, the protagonists are journeying on unaccompanied explorations, creating their own sense of the world. In the article “Motherhood and Reality in Northanger Abbey,” written by Elvira Casal, the concept of embarking on solo journeys are necessary for emotional growth and connection. Casal writes:

The heroines of the novels are daughters, not mothers, and the novels focus on the stage of a woman’s life when she is least likely to feel close to her mother. Falling in love and marrying involve reaching outside a person’s original family for love, affection, and validation. Choosing a husband therefore implicitly requires the daughter’s emotional movement away from the mother. (146)

Elizabeth’s would-be husband

This scenario plays out in many instances in Austen’s texts. Mothers, or mother figures, represent traditions, usually imploring the heroines to make socially safe decisions and prevent societal risk. If this is the model that mother figures promote, then Elizabeth would have married Mr. Collins and Catherine Morland would have married John Thorpe. Safe decisions adhere to tradition, therefore losing individual choice and succumbing to patriarchy yet again. Women traditionally married to survive, promoting arrogant men, like Thorpe, or pompous men, like Collins, as suitable candidates, while forsaking good men like Mr. Martin or Capt. Wentworth due to their untraditional status.

The void of a maternal presence affects characters differently. There is a freedom with loss, as well as a grief.  Emma becomes a valued member of her town. She suppresses nothing. Catherine Morland creates her own experiences without influence from her mother or Mrs. Allen. There is no intermediary between her and courtship or adventures. The void of a mother figure results in creating unrecognized freedom from the patriarchal influence. Mothers were not present to steer their daughter’s paths along the established and conformed road. On the contrary, women a bit older than our heroines, not only exist in patriarchy, but they contribute to it with false power. Fanny Dashwood employs her husband’s gender for her personal use. Instead of challenging patriarchy, she accepts it and practices it. Lady Catherine not only accepts it but actively represents it. She operates under the pretense that she has power because of her lineage while her wishes seem to be ignored.

No matter the significance, Austen’s heroines have a loss of a powerful maternal presence in common. Some can find that the lack of a matriarch only reinforces patriarchy but there is significant evidence to suggest that power is created because of that loss. Austen subtly challenges her societal foundation by severing the link between generations, and by undercutting a powerful maternal authority, the heroines begin to rely on their own individuality for direction, sustenance, and power. They are personally prosperous, despite lacking maternal influence or societal power, and their wit and sensibility are often rewarded. As the possession of wealth being usually denied, with inheritance going to males, and women lacking supremacy of their fates, Austen’s heroines had to rely on their character for survival and guidance, and the lack of mother figures allowed for this situation to occur.

***

Work Cited

Austen, Jane. Northanger Abbey, Lady Susan, The Watsons, and Sandition. Oxford World’s Classics. 2008. Print.

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. ed. Robert P. Irvine. Peterborough: Broadview Press, 2002

Austen. Jane. Sense and Sensibility. Penguin Random House. 2014. Print

Casal, Elvira. “Motherhood and Reality in Northanger Abbey”. Persuasions: The Jane Austen Journal. JASNA. No. 20, 1998. 146-153.

Dashwood, Rita. “Women Owning Property: The Great Lady in Jane Austen”Jane Austen and Philosophy. Edited by Mimi Marinucci. Rowland and Littlefield. 2017.

Dougherty, Kathleen. “Marriage and Friendship in Jane Austen: Self-knowledge, Virtue, and the “Second Self””Jane Austen and Philosophy.Edited by Mimi Marinucci. Rowland and Littlefield. 2017.

Restuccia, Frances L. “A Black Morning: Kristevan Melancholia in Jane Austen’s Emma.” American Imago, vol. 51, no. 4, 1994, p. 447+

 

About the author of this Jane Austen essay

Mark Massaro received his Master’s Degree in English Literature from Florida Gulf Coast University with a focus on 20th Century American Literature. He is an English Instructor at two universities. When not reading or writing, he can be found in his black Chucks at a bonfire in his home state of Massachusetts, talking with friends and listening to classic rock. His creative works have been published in Literary Juice Magazine, The Pegasus Review, and The Mangrove Review. His happiness is being next to his wife, with their son in his arms, and their golden retriever curled up nearby.

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Jane Austen News – Issue 164

What’s the Jane Austen News this week? 


On Beating Writer’s Block

Boxed Calligraphy SetIf you long to be a writer like Jane Austen, then the phrase ‘writer’s block’ is one to be feared. However, we came across a fantastic article this week with great tips on how to beat writer’s block should it hit you.

Tip One: Put on a blindfold

Try training your mind by dressing with a blindfold. Doing so will require you to use all of your other senses, actively engaging your imagination as you feel your way through the clothing, using tactile clues to decode your surroundings. After all, the best books don’t just focus on what characters can see, but also on sounds, smells, tastes, and emotions.

Tip Two: People watch

Look outside your window to see the people in the street. Look at how people dress and at their expressions. Try to imagine what has happened in their lives in the moments before you saw them or what might happen to them later that day.

Tip Three: Visit an art gallery

Head to your local art gallery (or search online for art collections). Look at the pieces and each time you hear yourself think “I don’t like that,” or “I like that one,” ask yourself why or why not. Art is an interpretation of the world each person sees, and as well as spurring new ideas, it can be insight into your own mind and that of the artist.

Tip Four: Try free writing

Free writing is where you pick a topic and let your imagination run wild. Try not to stop to think. Keep your pen moving. You can write to a prompt, or write as a character. The faster you go, the closer to your natural voice your free writing will get, and it’s sure to take you in unexpected directions.

(Also, why not try getting yourself an inspiring set of stationery to write with…? As it’s stationery week this week, this is the prime time to do it!)

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Jane Austen News – Issue 163

The Jane Austen News includes a Judi Dench film-off!

What’s the Jane Austen News this week? 

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Jane Austen News – Issue 161

The Jane Austen News from New York

What’s the Jane Austen News this week?


 Pemberley in New York

If you loved the scenes of Pemberley in the 2005 film adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, and wished that you could visit the location where it was filmed,  then you might be able to do the next best thing if you’re able to get to New York between June 28th and September 18th 2019.

David Korins, the set designer for the musical Hamilton is behind the new exhibition which is due to open at Sotheby’s in New York on June 28th. It sees the essence of Chatsworth house and estate (which was the filming location for the series Death Comes to Pemberley in 2013, and the exterior filming location for Pemberley for the 2005 Pride and Prejudice film) translated for the smaller space of the galleries of Sotheby’s.

The exhibition will feature 45 artworks, decorative objects, pieces of jewelry, clothing and archive materials — all drawn from the Devonshire Collection, accumulated over about 500 years by the Cavendish family, and held at Chatsworth House. However, Korins realized that he didn’t just want to make the artwork and objects part of the exhibition; he wanted to include the details of the house itself. In the form of blown-up 360-degree sculptures, Mr. Korins will magnify small details — table legs, moldings, chair feet, corners of rooms — and use them as vitrines and set pieces for the artworks and objects on display.

Chatsworth Exhibition Rendering

The Duke of Devonshire said he’s thrilled by Mr. Korins’s imaginative design for the exhibition. “I think he has a brilliant way of getting across a grand space in a smaller space,” he said. “I think the architecture of this exhibition will focus attention on the works, and we’ll look at them in a different sort of way.”

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Jane Austen News – Issue 160

Jane Austen News

What’s the Jane Austen News this week?


Plans for Jane Austen in Bronze in Bath 

Jane Austen NewsPlans are in the works to honour Jane Austen, perhaps Bath’s most famous resident, with a life-size monument.

The Jane Austen Centre hopes to erect a bronze statue of the famous author at a location in the city later this year. The statue will be based on the Jane Austen waxwork which was unveiled at the Centre to global media interest in July 2014, and which was created through work undertaken by forensic artist Melissa Dring.

The sculptor of the bronze statue will be world-renowned Mark Richards, whose previous work not only includes the Austen waxwork but also Winston Churchill, Prince Philip and The Queen.

The exact location of the bronze statue is currently under discussion.

Not only will it be good to honour Austen the author, it will also be good to go a little way to redress the fact that less than 3% of all statues in the UK are of historical, non-royal women.

Paul Crossey, Jane Austen Centre Managing Director

What do you think? Is there an ideal location for a Jane Austen statue in Bath that springs to mind?

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Jane Austen News – Issue 159

The Jane Austen News enjoyed this new TED-Ed video

What’s the Jane Austen News this week?


An Animated Lesson on Jane Austen 

This week we came across a wonderful new video on the TED-Ed website.

TED-Ed are original lessons published on the TED website, only instead of an on-stage talk given by a speaker, the Ted-Ed videos feature the words and ideas of educators, that are then brought to life by professional animators.

This video below is given by Iseult Gillespie, who explores the sly societal satire and unique tongue-in-cheek humor of Jane Austen. At the Jane Austen News we thought the video utter charming.

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