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Brawn: A favorite Christmas treat

On one side was a table occupied by some chattering girls, cutting up silk and gold paper; and on the other were tressels and trays, bending under the weight of brawn and cold pies, where riotous boys were holding high revel; the whole completed by a roaring Christmas fire, which seemed determined to be heard, in spite of all the noise of the others. Persuasion Christmas celebrations wouldn’t be the same if we didn’t pull out all those favorite recipes year after year. For some people it’s cookies and cakes, for others a particular bread or main dish. The Georgians were no exception and their celebrations called for many party foods- traditional favorites that could be made ahead and brought out to tempt company. Whether it was the Austen’s “Black Butter”, White Soup or the famed Christmas Pudding. Another favorite dish was Brawn or, served cold, Souse. This dish, now commonly called Headcheese, was made from pork and bones spiced, boiled and set to cool in molds. The result, turned out on a board, was similar to today’s Jell-O and was served with mustard. Brawn To a pig’s head weighing 6 lbs. allow 1 1/2 lb. lean beef, 2 tablespoonfuls of salt, 2 teaspoonfuls of pepper, a little cayenne, 6 pounded cloves. Mode-Cut off the cheeks and salt them, unless the head be small, when all may be used. After carefully cleaning the head, put it on in sufficient cold water to cover it, with the beef, and skim it

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