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This Week at the Jane Austen Giftshop

The Ultimate Teapot for Jane Austen Fans! This wonderfully quirky glazed ceramic teapot, designed to resemble a row of Jane Austen books, can be used as a stylish accompaniment to your table or simply displayed as an ornament. Entirely handmade and hand painted in the UK, using methods developed over 250 years ago, no two teapots are exactly the same. Variations produced by the production and hand painting processes ensure that every one is unique, and a true collectors’ item. See More Here   Back in stock this week These sterling silver hook Regency Pearl Earrings are a double-drop design which was highly popular in the Georgian and Regency periods. Unique to the Jane Austen Gift Shop, they are made from hallmarked 925 sterling silver and the stones used are pearls and faceted labradorites. Supplied in a luxury Jane Austen gift box. See More Here   The dolls are back, too! Decorate your home in Regency splendour with our doll decorations from your favourite Jane Austen works. The irresistible dolls are handmade using traditional techniques, and come complete with a loop hanger. Choose from Darcy, Lizzy, Emma, Mr Knightley, Anne Elliot, Captain Wentworth, or Jane herself!   Half Price For One Week Only! This beautiful and unusual necklace is handmade in Bath. Finished with beads and silver plated, it includes a piece of a page taken from Pride and Prejudice and a 45cm chain. An unmissable offer at half the normal price!     Back in Print: Our Glossy Pride (more…)
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Jane Austen News – Issue 120

Jane Austen News

What’s the Jane Austen News this week? 


Austen In “Writing The West” Course

Jane Austen wasn’t the only writer to be inspired by and live in the South West. Other famous poets and novelists of the 18th and 19th century who are associated with the West of England include Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Robert Southey, Mary Shelley and Thomas Hardy, and it is these authors, in addition to Jane Austen, who are the subject of a new, free online course.

Writing the West: Literature & Place explores how these writers found inspiration in the West Country, and how they contribute to the culture and economy of the region today. Those taking part in the course will explore their lives, gain insight into their writing, and see the places that influenced them.

The course will start on the 18th of June and will release new content each week, comprising between 3-4 hours study each week which will include articles, videos and interaction with the teaching team through questions and online discussion. The course materials will remain available after the end of the course so that learners can take the course at their own pace.

To find out more and enroll you can visit the course site at: www.udemy.com/writing-the-west

Continue reading Jane Austen News – Issue 120

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Why Jane Austen’s Persuasion Still Captivates Audiences

Jane Austen's PersuasionThis Spring 2018, Theatre6 is producing a touring production of Jane Austen’s Persuasion. Artistic Director Kate McGregor discusses why they’ve chosen to adapt the work for six actor musicians, and why Persuasion remains so captivating for today’s audiences. Adapting a novel like Jane Austen’s Persuasion for the stage, from the earliest planning stages until the opening night, is a project that absorbs your days and nights for at least two years. In making the decision to dedicate such time to a piece, it has to be one which you’d like to explore visually, conceptually, emotionally and intellectually. Most importantly, it has to be a story that will excite, captivate and be relevant for your audiences. For Stephanie Dale (the novel’s adapter) and I, our biggest inspiration for working on the piece was the character of Anne. We envisioned how the themes in Persuasion could transcend time and space, and imagined how Jane’s ideas could breathe and thrive in our modern world.   A novel must show how the world truly is, how characters genuinely think, how events actually occur, a novel should somehow reveal the true source of our actions – Jane in Becoming Jane.   Set against the backdrop of the Napoleonic wars, this is a story about heartbreak. It’s about making decisions you regret, about trusting the right people for the wrong reasons. It asks questions about the inner workings of why we love and who loves the longest. Most importantly it’s an expression of Anne inner thoughts (more…)
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Finding Happiness, Austen Style, with Emma, our favourite matchmaker

Finding happiness with EmmaWelcome to the fourth of a multi-part series of posts on how to lift yourself out of the blues, Austen style. This time, with Emma. Kindly reproduced here with permission from its author, Laurie Viera Rigler, who is also the author of the popular Jane Austen Addict novels. Does the following sound familiar to you? You’ve found the perfect certain someone for your friend, neighbour, colleague, or other unsuspecting acquaintance. There’s just one small problem: Said friend has told you that no way, no how is he/she interested in that perfect certain someone. And yet, you know better–just as you always do. Just as Emma, the eponymous heroine of Austen’s novel, always did. Hold on a minute. Did Jane Austen write two versions of Emma? Or could it be that you, like Emma, are turning into the queen of know-it-all? Heaven forbid. After all, look what happened to Emma. She very nearly totally screwed up her life. But never fear. We’ve got a little game for you to play. It’s called “Emma, Reformed Matchmaker.” All you need to do is follow the rules: 1. You’ll need to play with a single friend (preferably a single friend who would like to be in a couple. Otherwise, we might need to come up with another game entitled, “Emma Reformed Bulldozer”). 2. Each of you sits down and writes a list of qualities that your friend’s perfect, future mate should possess. 3. Do not reveal what is on your lists until both of you are finished writing. 4. Now share. You (more…)
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Favourite Austenesque Retellings – Top Ten

an austenesque retellingAlthough nothing can beat reading Jane’s own novels, sometimes it’s nice to read an ‘Austenesque’ story. These can be based on Jane’s novels, a prequel or sequel to them, in the same kind of style… We can’t say for sure what makes a story an Austenesque story, but what we can be sure of is that there are a lot to choose from! In this blog post, Meredith from Austenesque Reviews runs through her recent top ten Austenesque retellings. ***** While many Austenesque stories take place in the Regency era and many take place in modern times, there are a handful that are set somewhere in between. These stories take Jane Austen’s beloved characters and bring them to new time periods and/or settings. Sometimes these stories are referred to as ‘alternate universe,’ but I like to use the term – Retellings. Often times in these stories the setting feels like a character in and of itself. And I love seeing how authors immerse Jane Austen’s characters and the reader in these unique and diverse settings. The amount of Austenesque Retellings (that are not modern-day retellings) published may be small, but many of them are such sensational reads I thought it would be fun to highlight my favorites! Here are 10 fabulous Austenesque retellings that are so deserving of praise and recognition! * These lists are based only on the novels I have read and reviewed and are my top ten favourites. **These lists are subject to change.   *** (in (more…)
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The Enduring Inspiration of Miss Jane Austen Now and Forever

Reviewer of Austenesque works

We’re delighted to be able to bring you this fantastic blog post by Claudine Pepe; blogger and devoted Austen fan, in which she asks fellow Austenesque authors why Jane Austen inspires them so much, and why they personally have an enduring love for Jane Austen and all things Austenesque.

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Fans of Jane Austen throughout the world connect with her today in so many different ways.

For me, as well as for thousands of other readers, our love for Jane Austen now continues in the fan fiction stories that we love to read based on the characters she created over 200 years ago. I don’t know how many other authors have such a large amount of fan fiction that is published based on their work, but for me it has been a blessing and a joy to be part of the Jane Austen Fan Fiction community, where we are able to continue to enjoy Jane’s characters and stories in so many new ways.

I am so grateful to Miss Austen for starting all of this with her wonderfully crafted stories and her characters that feel as true-to-life as our very own family and friends. I also would like to thank all of the authors who have been inspired so deeply by their love for Jane Austen’s work that they themselves take on the challenges of creating stories based on her work to entertain readers all over the globe.

In tribute to Jane Austen, today I am sharing some of my quotes from my favorite Jane Austen Fan Fiction writers who have visited Just Jane 1813 over the past few years, as they share with us how they have also been inspired by the brilliant Jane Austen. I can never thank Jane Austen enough for giving us her unforgettable stories, but it is my hope that this post demonstrates our appreciation and love for this talented and witty woman!

 

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“I happened to be at a train station without a book and picked up Longbourn by Jo Baker, which I really enjoyed, though I wasn’t always happy with the depictions of Darcy and Elizabeth, but it started me looking for other books on my Kindle and I was delighted to find that there were hundreds of variations and sequels, and I devoured them. There are some brilliant JAFF writers around and they inspired me. I remember reading Joana Starnes’ book The Falmouth Connection, putting it down and thinking ‘that was bloody great, I want to have a go myself.’ At that time I just used to read books I found on Amazon, and I had no idea there were blogs and places like ‘A Happy Assembly’ or even that Meryton Press existed. Continue reading The Enduring Inspiration of Miss Jane Austen Now and Forever

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The Perfect Jane Austen Teacup Cupcakes!

Our new re-usable Jane Austen Teacup Cupcake Cases have proved a huge hit, and a number of you have asked us if we had any cup cake recipes that would be perfect for use with the little cups… … and indeed we do!   Ingredients: 50g caster sugar 50g butter/margarine  50g self-raising flour 1 egg A few drops of vanilla essence   Preheat the oven to 190 degrees. Cream together the sugar and the butter until smooth. Beat the egg and then add it to the sugar/butter mixture a little at a time. Stir in the sifted flour and vanilla essence. Grease the teacup insides and place onto a baking tray. Divide the mixture evenly between the four teacups. Bake for between 15-20 minutes or until the cakes look golden brown. Wait until cool and then decorate!   For coffee cake:  Add 5ml (one teaspoon) of instant coffee, dissolved in hot water, to the cake mixture along with the flour and instead of the vanilla essence.   We’d love to see how you get on! Feel free to email photographs of your creations to us at austensocialmedia@gmail.com, or message us on Facebook or Twitter!   Save Save Save Save Save (more…)
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Jane and Cassandra: Extraordinary Sisters

Jane and Cassandra

by Caroline Kerr Taylor

Jane and Cassandra
Anna Maxwell Martin and Anne Hathaway as Cassandra and Jane in the film ‘Becoming Jane’ (2007)

Jane Austen was born in December 1775, the seventh child of Rev. and Mrs. Austen. Mrs. Austen nursed each of her babies for the first few months before they were taken to a neighboring family (the Littleworths). Each child was looked after by this family for the first couple of years until the child could walk and talk. The parents visited regularly during this time, until the child was ready to be brought back into the Austen household. This was not a totally uncommon practice for the time, nor was it considered unfeeling. As long as the baby was well cared for, that was what mattered to the Austens. Knowing today what we know of the importance of mother/baby bonding it would have been extremely disrupting for a child to be taken from its mother after just a few months and placed with another family. (And then, later, wrenched from that family when the Austens felt the child was ready to rejoin their household.) This could be a significant reason why Jane became attached more deeply to her sister than to her mother.

Continue reading Jane and Cassandra: Extraordinary Sisters

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