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Jane Austen News – Issue 74

The Jane Austen News couldn't agree more!

What’s the Jane Austen News this week?  

  Austen Holy Grail Worth Half A Million  

““Although there are attractive editions of her novels published in the later 19th and early 20th centuries, the greatest value is, of course, in the first editions,” says Mark Wiltshire, a specialist in valuable books and manuscripts at Christie’s.” 

A new article published by The Times this week has extolled the benefits of investing in books, and in early editions of Jane Austen’s books in particular. It’s easy to see why considering the fact that rare bookseller Peter Harrington is in the process of selling a first edition of Mansfield Park— of which there are only 1,250 — and the price it is expected to go for is around £17,500! This is a hefty sum, but not when compared to the auction record for a Jane Austen; in 2008 a first edition of Emma was sold by Bonhams auction house for £180,000. It was a presentation copy to Austen’s friend and governess, Anne Sharp, which was inscribed “from the author” by a publisher or clerk on Austen’s behalf.

However, the best price would, the article says, go to a signed edition.

“It is hard to say what a copy inscribed by Austen would fetch [the holy grail in terms of Austen — such a thing may not exist], but I am pretty sure it would be a record for a 19th-century book, and it could easily fetch as much as half a million pounds.”

It may not exist…but we can dream!


The Bank of England in Literature  

To coincide with its release of the new Jane Austen £10 note, the Bank of England is launching a new exhibition exploring its literary connections.

Stories from the City will feature various artefacts on display which highlight over 300 years of literary connections to the Bank. These include a Charles Dickens £10 note – with the original hand-drawn artwork that goes with it, and a One Thousand Pound Note signed by George Eliot.

Some of the other authors referenced in the exhibition include Jules Verne and John Brophy, who are just some of the authors who have mentioned the Bank of England in their work. (Others, including P.G. Wodehouse, T.S. Eliot and Charles Lamb, worked nearby and drew inspiration from it.)

The exhibition is on at the Bank of England Museum from July 19th 2017 until summer 2018.

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