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Make Your Own Virtual Georgian Wig

Making your own Georgian wig

Before the relatively demure fashions of the Regency period came into Vogue, the Georgian ladies (and gentleman to a lesser degree) reveled in creating the most outlandish and elaborate wigs. To do this they built the hair up using padding and hair pieces and then gooey pastes from pig’s fat were used to keep it all in place.

Next, once the tower was tall enough, they applied coloured hair powders, bows, flowers, fans, feathers, even in some cases small ships!

The taller the wig, the most ostentatious the decorations, the better.

While we may not be keen to actually wear one of these Georgian wig structures – as, not only are they are rather expensive and unwieldy, they’re also very heavy – we do rather like designing them. This is where a website which we came across earlier this week comes into play.

The Victoria and Albert museum created a free online tool which allows you all the fun of making your own whimsical wig, without having to do any of the brushing and architectural balancing! We rather enjoyed ourselves seeing who could make the wildest wig, so we thought you might like to know about it too!

You can find the wig-builder here.

 


Jane Austen Day with Charlotte

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