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Create Tambour Work Embroidery

tambour lace

Tambour work was a popular form of “quick” embroidery used on gowns, lace shawls and scarves and other projects, particularly during the mid 1700’s to mid 1800’s, when automated machines took over the work of skilled seamstresses and the delicate patterns produced fell from fashion. To begin,  one worked a basic chain stitch on the top of the fabric, using a specially made tambour needle.

Tambour needle from The Encyclopedia of Needlework.
Tambour needle from The Encyclopedia of Needlework.

 

The patterns created varied from simple white on white borders and patterns, like this lace scarf:

Detail of antique Tamboured lace.
Detail of antique Tamboured lace.

…to complex collages of color and texture as displayed on this gown:

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Tambour Work

During the Regency era there were any number of ways to embellish a gown, from printing or painting directly on the fabric, to adding lace and other accents, or even embroidery. One method of embroidery, Tambour Work, was especially popular for it’s ease of application. Tambour is French for drum, and refers to the method of creating the embroidery.

According to Jessamyn Reeves Brown”s Costume Companion,

Tambour work was at least as popular as embroidery and was faster to produce. The fabric to be worked was stretched on a large frame held on a stand, and the lady used a hook like a tiny, sharp crochet hook to punch through the fabric and create a chain stitch. The result is almost indistinguishable from embroidered chain stitch except that it is so very fine and even, and the work goes more quickly. Tambour work is still used on couture clothing today.

Fine muslins were perfect for tambouring because the loose weave was easy to punch through without damaging. Most work of the era was white-on-white; subtle, but the translucency of the muslin contrasted with the opacity of the tambouring. In addition to tambouring their dresses, fine ladies tamboured fichus (neckcloths), shawls (not very warm, but pretty), reticules, and more.

By the 1830’s, machines had been created which could produce tambour work fabric 140 times faster than the average seamstress. Professional tambour artists were out of a job, and the ladies of leisure soon found other hand crafts to occupy their time and talents. Victorian tastes drifted away from the delicate details of the previous era and the art was virtually forgotten for a time.

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