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Crocheted Gloves


Crochet is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. The word is
derived from the French word “crochet”, meaning hook. Crocheting, similar to knitting,
consists of pulling loops of yarn through other loops. Crochet differs from knitting in that
only one loop is active at one time, and that a crochet hook is used instead of knitting
needles.

The following Crochet Pattern will create one pair of Crocheted Lace Gloves to fit the
average hand. These gloves will stretch to fit most women’s hands; washing will restore them
to their original size.

Materials:
1-1/2 oz of a fine mercerized crochet cotton (No. 20); Size 7 steel crochet hook; Tubular
elastic to fit around wrists.

Gauge:6 Solomon’s knots to 2″ worked on size 7 steel hook. To save time, take time to check
gauge.

Right-hand glove:
Join length of elastic to fit around wrist. Work 100 sc over elastic and join with a sl st to
first sc.

1st round * Extend loop on hook to a height of approximately 1/4″, yo and draw a loop through
extended loop on hook, insert hook from front to back in the back strand of the loop just
made, yo and draw a loop through, there are now 2 loops on hook, yo and draw through 2 loops
on hook- called 1 Solomon’s knot or 1 SK -, skip next 4 sc, 1 sc in next sc, rep from * 19
more times. Do not turn at end of rounds.

2nd round * 1 SK, inserting hook under 2 top loops only of extended st work 1 sc in next SK
of previous round – called 1 sc top -, rep from * to end.

Last round forms SK pat.

Shape base of thumb

3rd round As 2nd round.

4th round (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in next SK- 1 SK inc made -, * 1 SK, 1 sc top in next SK,
rep from * to end.

5th round As 2nd round.

6th round (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in first SK, (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in 2nd SK, * 1 SK, I sc
top in next SK, rep from * to end.

7th round As 2nd round.

8th round (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in first SK, mark this inc with a colored thread, (1 SK, 1
sc top in next SK) 4 times, (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in next SK, *1 SK, 1 sc top in next SK,
rep from * to end.

9th-13th rounds As 2nd round.

Divide for thumb

14th round Work in pat to position directly above marked inc, 3 SK, skip next 7 SK, 1 sc top
in next SK, mark last st with a colored thread, *1 SK, 1 sc top in next SK, rep from * to
end.

15th-20th rounds As 2nd round. 20 SK.

Divide for first finger

21st round Work in pat to position directly above marked st, 2 SK, skip next 13 SK, 1 sc top
in next SK.

First finger:
Next round (1 SK, I sc top in next SK) 8 times.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 8 SK until finger measures 3″ from beg or length required.

Next round Ch l, (1 sc top in next SK, ch 1) 8 times.

Next round 1 sc in each of next 8 sc. Fasten off, leaving an end of yarn approx. 8″ long.

Thread yarn through last round and pull tightly to gather.

Secure yarn and cut off close to sts.

Second finger:
Next round With palm facing, rejoin yarn to sc at base of first finger, (1 SK, I sc top in
next SK) twice, 2 SK, skip next 9 SK of last round of palm, 1 sc top in next SK, (1 SK, 1 sc
top in next SK) twice, (1 SK, l sc top in base of first finger) twice.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 8 SK until finger measures 3-1/4″ from beg or

length required.

Complete as for first finger.

Third finger:
Next round With palm facing, rejoin yarn to sc at base of 2nd finger, (1 SK, 1 sc top in next
SK) twice, 2 SK, skip next 5 SK, 1 sc top in next SK, (1 SK, 1 sc top in next SK) twice, (1
SK, 1 sc top in base of 2nd finger) twice.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 8 SK until finger measures 3″ from beg or length required.

Complete as for first finger.

Fourth finger:

Next round With palm facing, rejoin yarn to sc at base of 3rd finger, (1 SK, 1 sc top in next
SK) 5 times, (1 SK, 1 sc top in base of 3rd finger) twice.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 7 SK until finger measures 2-3/4′ from beg or length
required.

Next round Ch 1, (1 sc top in next SK, ch 1) 7 times.

Next round I sc in each of next 7 sc. Fasten off and complete as for first finger.

Thumb
Next round With RS facing, rejoin yarn to sc at right of thumb opening, (1 SK, 1 sc top in
next SK) 7 times, (1 SK, 1 sc in next sc) 3 times across back of thumb opening, (1 SK, 1 sc
top in next SK) 7 times, 1 sc top in next SK, skip next SK-1 SK dec.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 9 SK until thumb measures 2-1/2″ from beg or length
required.

Next round Ch 1, (1 sc top in next SK, ch 1) 9 times.

Next round 1 sc in each of next 9 sc.

Fasten off and complete as for first finger.

Cuff
Turn glove upside-down and, with RS facing, rejoin yarn to elastic between any 2 sc worked
over elastic.

1st round Work 100 sc over elastic, inserting hook between previous sc.

2nd round (2 SK, skip next 3 sc, 1 sc in each of next 2 sc) 20 times.

3rd round (2 SK, 1 sc in knot between 2 SK) 20 times.

4th-6th rounds As 3rd round.

7th round * 1 SK, 7 sc in knot between next 2 SK, rep from * to end, join with a sl st to
first SK. Fasten off.

Left-hand glove
Work palm, fingers and thumb as for right-hand glove, then turn work inside-out.

Work cuff as for right-hand glove.

To Finish:
Weave in all loose ends invisibly and cut close to sts. Do not press.

Spray gloves lightly with water and leave to dry naturally. Lightly spray cuffs with starch.

You can buy ready made crochet gloves online at janeaustengiftshop.co.uk – click here.


These instructions are provided courtesy of Craftown.com. Visit their site for hundreds of other free project ideas.

Purchase your own crocheted gloves from our giftshop, available in
white. Ecru gloves are available from Austentation: Regency
Accessories
.

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A Description of the Funeral for Princess Amelia


Princess Amelia was born on 7 August 1783, at the Royal Lodge, Windsor, the youngest daughter of
George III and Queen Charlotte, and the youngest of their fifteen children. She is reputed to have
been her father’s favourite, and he called her “Emily.” As the daughter of the monarch, she was
styled HRH The Princess Amelia from birth.

She became ill in 1795, and was known to suffer from consumption, from which she eventually died, and
erysipelas, a painful type of skin infection. Her eldest brother, later George IV, was her godfather
and is reputed to have requested her death mask.

Amelia and her sisters, Charlotte, Augusta Sophia, Elizabeth, Mary and Sophia were over-protected and
isolated, which restricted their meeting eligible suitors of their own age.

Amelia fell in love with Hon. Sir Charles FitzRoy, an equerry 21 years older than herself, and the
son of Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton, but was forbidden to marry him by her mother Queen
Charlotte. There is conflicting evidence as to whether or not the two did marry, but they did have
one son, Hugh Huntly (d. 1829)

Her death on November 2, 1810, led to a decline in her father’s health which resulted in his insanity
and the subsequent invocation of the Regency Act of 1811. She was buried in the royal vault in St
George’s Chapel, Windsor.

While most funerals during the Regency were quiet affairs with only the male members of the family
attending, a Royal Funeral called for special treatment.


A Description of the Funeral for Princess Amelia


The Lady’s Magazine, or Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex,
Appropriated solely to their
Use and Amusement
,

November 1810

During the service, which was read by the Honorable and Rev. the Dean of Windsor, his Royal Highness
the Prince of Wales, and his Royal brothers, as well as the Knights of the Garter present, occupied
their respective stalls. The Nobility, Privy Councillors, and officers of the household, as well as
others who had followed the body, were plasced in the vacant and intermediate stalls. The Ladies’
attendants were in the seat below the stalls on the north side nearest the Altar; the Grooms of the
bed-chamber, Physicians, Rector and Curate of Windsor, Surgeon, Apothecary, and Solicitor of her late
Royal Highness, in the seat below the stalls on the south side, nearest the Altar; the equerries, and
the Queen’s and Princesses’ other attendants, in the front seats on either side; the pages were
arranged below the Altar.

The part of the service before the interment, and the anthem, being performed, the procession moved
out of the choir in the order in which it had entered, and proceeed up the north aisle of the choir,
flanked by the Royal Horse Guards, blue, to the place of burial behind the Altar.

The body being deposited in the vault, and the service concluded, Sir Isaac Heard Garter, after a
short pause, pronounced, near the grave, the style of her late Royal Highness, as follows:–

Thus it hath pleased Almighty God, to take out of this transitory life unto his Divine Mercy the late
most Illustrious Princess Amelia, 6th and youngest daughter fo Most Excellent Majesty George the
Third, by the Grace of god, of the United Kingdom of Great-Britain and Ireland, King, Defender of the
Faith; whom God bless and preserve with long Life, Health, and Honor, and all worldly happiness.

After which, the Royal Princes, the nobility, and others, who had composed the procession, returned,
having witnessed that every part of this mournful and afflicting ceremony had been conducted with
great regularity, decorum, and solemnity.

Figure 1. FULL DRESS.–Black velvet, ornamented with jet and bugles, trimmed round the bosom with
Vandyke lace; the sleeves confined on the shoulders by jet broaches, the under sleeve of white satin,
with bugles; the waistband and head-dress the same: white kid gloves and shoes: fan of black crape.

Figure 2. Morning Dress–Of raven-grey silk, made tight at the throat, with white crape ruff: bonnet,
black silk and crape: black silk mantle; shoes and gloves same color as the dress: broach and ear-
rings of jet.


Historical information from Wikipedia, the online
encyclopedia>

Historical prints and descriptions from Cathy Decker’s Regency Fashion Page.

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Colourful Leather Gloves

 

I have unpacked the gloves and placed yours in your drawer. Their colour is light and pretty, and I believe exactly what we fixed on.
Jane Austen to Cassandra, October 27, 1798

“The wearing of gloves by women had been popular since the time of Catherine de Medici, but the Empress Josephine, by her fancy for long gloves, started a nationwide craze, which rapidly spread throughout all Europe and America, during the Napoleonic period. (She actually wore gloves for somewhat prosaic reasons, since she was very dissatisfied with her hands, thinking them ugly…)

Napoleonic and Regency (as this period was called in England – this was the era Jane Austen wrote about, and ladies wearing long gloves are often to be seen in films made of her books, such as Sense and Sensibility and Emma) gloves were of many materials and a bewildering variety of colors. Kidskin and cloth were favored materials, and the gloves were often made so that they fitted loosely around the wearer’s arm and could be “scrunched” down toward the wrist at the wearer’s option.

Starting from about 1810, sleeves began to grow longer, and the length of gloves in most cases shortened correspondingly. However, long gloves were still customarily worn with formal dress until around 1825:

Long gloves first became a staple of women’s fashion during the time of Napoleon, the English Regency and the reign of George IV (the former “Regent” of the Regency) (ca. 1795 to 1825). The short sleeves of Greco/Roman-inspired Directory and Empire dresses and gowns were well suited to complementation by long gloves, and their popularity received an additional boost with their frequent wear by the Empress Josephine. Gloves in that period were commonly constructed so as to fit the arm and hand in a looser fashion than gloves of the later Victorian and Edwardian periods, and longer gloves (elbow-length or longer) would often be worn “crumpled” below the elbow. When the longest gloves were stretched out above the elbow, they were often actually held in place by garters. In this gallery, a sampling of representative fashion plates displays long gloves as they were worn during this time.

Napoleon himself was a great lover of gloves; he is reported, as of 1806, to have in his wardrobe no fewer than 240 pairs of gloves! He was very much appreciative of beautiful and interesting feminine attire, and encouraged his Empress, Josephine, and the other ladies of his court to dress in the height of style and fashion. For example, at his and Josephine’s coronation in 1804, the gloves made for the ceremony cost thirty-three francs per pair, a considerable sum in these days – but then, good gloves have always been costly!” (Severn, p. 38)

According to the City of Worcester Museums, the city of Worcester was “famous for it’s gloving industry, which reached its peak between 1790 and 1820 when 150 manufacturers of gloves employed over 30,000 people in and around Worcester. At this time nearly half of all glovers in Britain were based in and around the city of Worcester. It is quite possible that Jane Austen wore a pair (or pairs) of gloves manufactured here.

Trade was strictly regulated by the government to protect home industries from foreign competition by placing large taxes on goods. Under this system the Worcester glove industry prospered greatly.

However during the 19th century the government encouraged free trade eventually lifting taxes in 1826 on foreign gloves. This happened at a time when French gloves had increased in popularity and causing a huge reduction in trade which eventually led to mass employment throughout the city.

While many of the smaller businesses did not survive this period, two of Worcester’s most famous gloving firms, Dent Allcroft and Co Ltd. and Fownes Gloves Ltd. survived by reorganising their workforce, introducing a factory system and improving the overall quality of the products. Both these firms went on to become leading glove manufacturers in Europe. ”


Quoted with permission from Operagloves.com

*Hand In Glove, Bill Severn (David McKay, 1965)

Gloves and mitts are available in our costume section. Visit our giftshop and escape into the world of Jane Austen.

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Gloves

“I was very lucky in my gloves–got them at the first shop I went to…and gave only four shillings for them; upon hearing which everybody at Chawton will be hoping and predicting that they cannot be good for anything, and their worth certainly remains to be proved; but I think they look very well.
Jane Austen, 1813

During the 19th century, ladies always wore regency gloves outside (so did gentlemen). In addition, they wore them for the most part indoors as well (always at balls, for instance). Made of cotton or kid, they were protection for the hands against dirt and the elements. Continue reading Gloves