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Spruce Beer

“But all this,” as my dear Mrs. Piozzi says, “is flight and fancy, and nonsense, for my master has his great casks to mind and I have my little children.” It is you, however, in this instance, that have the little children, and I that have the great cask, for we are brewing spruce beer again; but my meaning really is, that I am extremely foolish in writing all this unnecessary stuff when I have so many matters to write about that my paper will hardly hold it all. Little matters they are, to be sure, but highly important. Jane Austen, to Cassandra Southampton, Wednesday, January 7, 180 Portrait of Jeffrey Amherst (1717-1797), By Joshua Reynolds, 1765 In the June, 1759, orders for the Highland Regiment in North America stipulated that: “Spruce beer is to be brewed for the health and conveniency of the troops which will be served at prime cost. Five quarts of molasses will be put into every barrel of Spruce Beer. Each gallon will cost nearly three coppers.” Winter orders that year instructed that each post should keep enough molasses on hand “to make two quarts of beer for each man every day.” Whether it was brewed for health, holiday drinking, or simply as a tasty alternative to water (that’s debatable) Spruce beer was a common drink in Georgian England. Brewed along similar lines as Root Beer and Ginger Beer, it could be drunk fresh or allowed to ferment. The British Army’s recipe for Spruce Beer: (more…)