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Knit a Pineapple Purse

pineapple purse

The Pineapple Purse:

This  Pineapple shaped reticule resides in the Kyoto Museum’s 1800-1810 collection. In describing this bag, the museum comments,

This small bag (called “reticule” at that time) was elaborately and three-dimensionally knitted into the shape of a pineapple. Motifs of pineapples and other exotic articles associated with the tropics became popular because of the influence of Napoleon Bonaparte’s wife Joséphine, the then fashion leader, who was from the Island of Martinique.

It is absolutely charming and amazingly, the instructions for a similar looking reticule appeared in  The Lady’s Assistant for Executing Useful and Fancy Designs in Knitting Netting, and Crochet Work by Mrs. Jane Gaugain in 1841. Those instructions have been reproduced below, though recently, a new, updated pattern for this purse has been created from the original pattern. The updated pattern and photos of the completed project can be found here: http://www.gancedo.eu/content/pine-apple-bag

KNIT A PINEAPPLE PURSE:
This pinapple purse is knit to imitate the natural colour of the fruit as much as possible, still keeping the bag as bright in hues as consistency will permit. The top part is worked in four shades of green, of seven rows each, commencing with lightest, and working in succession to dark. This represents the leaves. The centre, or fruit part, is worked in shades of yellow, down to a rich brown, four in number, beginning with the lightest, and working 36 rounds of each; again with green finish as described in the working receipt.

The cast-on row looks handsome with a row of gilt beads; also on the centre stitch of each knob of fruit part there should be a bead, but it may be omitted if not wished. The green part for leaves is worked on right side, and is the right or outside part; the centre part of bag is like the wrong side of knitting, as well as the green part, at bottom. When the bag is finished, it is drawn at the termination of the top leaves; the bottom is finished with a bunch of green satin ribbon, rounded at the points like leaves.

Working Receipt.

Cast on with light-green common-sized purse twist on No. 19 wires, 96 on first wire, 96 on second wire, and 128 on third wire; work a plain round after the cast-on round.

1st Round, P6, 0, P, 0, P6, A; repeat all round.

2nd Round, *P6, 0, P, O, P6, A; repeat all round.

Repeat as second round 5 more rounds.

2nd Shade of Green.

8th Round, repeat as second round 7 more rounds.

* Observe you have here seven plain stitches before you make an open stitch, the first of which has nothing to do with the six plain, merely work it off before the six, as it is one of those three you knit into one, and will be required to finish the A on the last wire j the beginning and ending of every wire during the working of green will be the same as this.

3rd Shade of Green. 16th Round, repeat as second round 7 more rounds.

4tth Shade of Green.

24th Round, repeat as second round 7 more rounds.

32nd Round, with light yellow, turn and work a plain round. It is necessary here to observe, the A of the yellow must be transposed so as to come directly under the 0, P, 0, of green. Should you have more loops than six before taking in the three loops, lift them on to the right hand wire; do the same with the other two wires; having done so, you have not again to change any of the loops off the wires, as the following receipt is so arranged,—

33rd Round, P6, A, P6, 0, P, 0; repeat all round.

34th Round, P5, A, P6, 0, P, 0, P; repeat all round.

35th Bound, P4, A, P6, 0, P, 0, P2; repeat all round.

36th Round, P3, A, P6, 0, P, 0, P3; repeat all round.

37th Round, P2, A, P6, 0, P, O, P4; repeat all round.

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Repeat from 32nd to 49th round twice with third yellow

Repeat from 32nd to 49th round twice with fourth yellow; (if wished to be longer, add what is required in this shade.)

Repeat with each shade of green once from 32 to 49th round

P6, A, all round} Repeat these two rounds till the bag is almost closed, then draw
Plain, all round } it together with a needle.
This bag may be worked in shades of Berlin wool, on No. 16 wires.

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Emma: A Summer Sweater Knitting Pattern

summer sweater

Emma: A Summer Sweater Knitting Pattern

Martha’s… is just finished, and looks well… My mother desires me to say that she will knit one for you as soon as you return to choose the colours and pattern.
Jane Austen to Cassandra
February 9, 1807

This lightweight summer sweater was inspired by those wonderful regency muslin dresses that you see in films such as Pride and Prejudice.

Working with empire lines and puffed sleeves can be a bit of a challenge, especially as everyone’s bust line is a little bit different. So it seemed by far the simplest thing to work from the top down using the method pioneered by Wendy Burnard in her Custom Knits book.

This means that you can try it on as you go to check that the end of the bodice section finishes in the correct place for your shape. If like me you are a little busty it is also possible to add a few short rows to the front of the bodice to stop it riding up.

Knitted from the top down with set in, afterthought sleeves, the main body of the cardigan is worked in a true lace pattern with patterning on every row.

Yarn provided by The Unique Sheep.

Sizes:Finished Bust Size 33 (36, 40, 44, 48)” to fit bust 32-34 (36-38, 40-42, 44-46, 48-50)”. Because the garment is knitted in laceweight yarn on larger needles it has a good amount of stretch.

Shown in size 44”

Yarn:The Unique Sheep Eos Laceweight (50% merino 50% silk; 1260 yards [1190m]/100 grams): Blue Jeans(MC), 1 ball; you will only need about half this amount so 800yds of any similar weight laceweight will be plenty.

Needles: US#6 (4 mm): 24” and 36” circular

Gauge: 24 sts and 32 rows = 4” in eyelet lace pattern after light, wet blocking.

Notions: Removable markers in three different colors or designs; stitch holders; waste yarn for provisional cast on; tapestry needle; 9 (9, 11, 11, 13) small pearl buttons

Pattern Notes: This pattern is worked from the top down. After completing the front and back to the armholes the rest of the body is knitted in one piece.

The sleeves are worked by picking up stitches around the armholes and working short rows to complete the cap before continuing in the round to finish them.

English Lace Chart: Stitch repeat is highlighted in pink. The white portions of the chart are for the beginning and end of row only.
Body Lace Chart
Legend

 

Schematic

Back: Using waste yarn, US#6 (4mm) needles and a provisional cast on, CO 84 (84, 96, 96, 102) sts.

Change to the main yarn and work in the eyelet lace pattern until back measures 6, (6.5, 7.25, 6.75. 6.5)” Note: The larger sizes have a shorter length to account for a deeper armhole.

Shape armholes
: increase 1 st at both ends of next 3 (3, 3, 4, 4) RS rows.
CO 4 st at the beg of the next two rows for all sizes
CO 5 st at the beg of the next 2 (2, 2, 4, 6) rows; 108 (108, 120, 132, 148) sts.

Fronts: Please note that the neck shaping and the armhole shaping may take place at the same time

Return to the provisional CO and unzip the sts as follows:

Place 30 (30, 30, 30, 33) sts on a US#6 (4 mm) needle for the right front, 24 (24, 36, 36, 36) sts on to a stitch holder for the neck and 30 (30, 30, 30, 33) sts on a second stitch holder for the left front.

Work right front in eyelet lace pattern until front measures 6 (6.5, 7.25, 6.75. 6.5)”

Shape armholes: increase 1 st at armhole edge of next 3 (3, 3, 4, 4) RS rows.
CO 4 st at beg of the next RS row for all sizes
CO 5 st at beg of the next 1 (1, 1, 2, 3) RS rows

At the same time
When the front measures 6 (6.5, 7.25, 7.25, 7.5)” begin neck shaping as follows:
All sizes: Increase 1 st at neck edge of the work on every RS row, twice.
CO 5 (5, 8, 8, 8) sts at the neck edge of the next 2 RS rows.
Finish with a WS row.

Once all shaping has been completed you will have 54 (54, 60, 66, 74) sts.
Place these sts onto a stitch holder. Place the sts for the left front onto a US#6 (4mm) needle.

Complete the left front in same manner remembering to make the increases at the neck edge on the WS rows to mirror the R front. Finish with a WS row.

Join body
Because of the stitch counts, the eyelet pattern will not be able to be worked across the whole of the sts without disrupting the already set patterns on the fronts and the back. For this reason place a removable stitch marker at each underarm join and work the eyelet pattern as set on the fronts and the back as if they were still separate parts of the garment.

If you are going to add short row shaping to the fronts this is the time to do it.  Take note the number of additional rows you are adding because you will need to factor them into the buttonhole bands.

With RS facing, work across  left front sts (starting with the center front), PM, work back sts, PM, work right front sts (starting from the armhole edge). Working the eyelet pattern as set work in pattern until work measures 2.5 (2.5, 3, 3, 3.5)” from join, ending with a RS row. Remove side seam markers.
Next Row (WS): Knit, increasing 9 (9, 2, 12, 14) sts evenly across the work.
Next Row: *K2tog, yo, rep from * to end of row.
Next Row: K.

Lower lace portion
K2, pm, work in English lace pattern across the work until last 2 sts, pm, k2.

Please note that the lace pattern contains patterning on RS and WS rows.
Work lower portion of the cardigan without shaping keeping the two sts at each end in garter st until work measures approx 12 ( 12, 13, 13, 13)” or preferred length ending with a row 1 or 7 of the chart.
Picot Edge: Work 3 rows stockinette. Next Row (WS): *K2tog, yo, rep from * to end of row. Work 3 rows stockinette.
Place all sts on waste yarn. You can bind off the sts if you prefer, but you will need to do so VERY loosely or you will not be able to block the cardigan edge correctly.

Sleeves
Starting at the center of the base of the armhole, using a US#6 (4mm) 24” circular pick up 12 (12, 12, 18, 21) sts, pm ( 1st color), pick up 24 (26, 29, 29, 30) sts pm (2nd  color), pick up 48 (52, 58, 58, 60) sts, p ( 2nd color) , pick up 24 ( 26, 29, 29, 30)sts, pm (1st color), pick up 12 ( 12, 12, 18, 21) sts, pm (3rd color – to mark beg of rnd).

Knit to the first 2nd color marker, knit into the back and front of all sts between the two 2nd color markers (to create puffed sleeve), slip marker, w&t, purl across sts until you reach the first 2nd color marker. Slip marker, w&t. Start Eyelet lace chart. Continue to work back and forth across the sts working one more st at the end of each row, picking up wraps as you come to them, and wrapping and turning as you go until you have incorporated all sts up to the 1st color markers. You have now completed the sleeve cap.
From here you will begin to knit in the round. Remove all markers except for the beg of rnd marker at the base of the armhole and continue in patt until work measures 1 (1, 1.5, 1.5, 1,5)” from armhole edge at the base of the sleeve.
Work one rnd k2tog across all sts,
Picot Edge: Work 3 rnds stockinette.
Work one rnd k2tog, yo across all sts
Work 3 rnds stockinette. BO all sts.
Turn picot edge under and slip st into place.

Repeat for other sleeve

Finishing your summer sweater

Neckband
With RS facing and US#6 (4mm) circular needle, pick up 48 (51, 60, 60, 63) sts along right front, knit across the sts on the st holder from the back neck and pick up 48 (51, 60, 60, 63) sts down left front.

Work 3 rnds stockinette.
Work one rnd *k2tog, yo* across all sts.
Work 3 rnds stockinette.
BO all sts.
Turn picot edge under and slip st into place.

Bodice edge and buttonholes
Please note that if you added short row shaping to the fronts you will need to pick up extra sts for the button bands and adjust the numbers for the buttonholes.

Left Front
With RS facing, pick up 20 (20, 24, 24, 28) sts from the neck edge to the bottom edge of the Eyelet Lace portion of the bodice. Knit one row, BO all sts.

Right Front and Buttonholes
With RS facing, pick up 20 (20, 24, 24, 28) sts from the Eyelet Lace portion of the bodice to the neck edge, knit one row.

Next Row: K1, *k2tog yo, rep from * until 1 st rem, k1.
Next Row: K.
BO all sts.

Blocking
Block the cardigan using your preferred method. Block out the bottom lace portion to the dimensions given in the schematic.

Slip st the bottom picot edge into place stitch by stitch off the waste yarn.
Thread the ribbon through the eyelet row and trim to size. Sew on the buttons to correspond to the buttonholes.

 


Janine Le Cras lives, works, and windsurfs on the small island of Guernsey in the middle of the English Channel. When she is not knitting, spinning or designing she can usually be found on her favorite beach sailing over the waves.

She can also be found at her blog and on Ravelry under the user name Guernseygal.

Pattern and images of the summer sweater © 2009 Janine LeCras.

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Crocheted Gloves


Crochet is a process of creating fabric from yarn or thread using a crochet hook. The word is
derived from the French word “crochet”, meaning hook. Crocheting, similar to knitting,
consists of pulling loops of yarn through other loops. Crochet differs from knitting in that
only one loop is active at one time, and that a crochet hook is used instead of knitting
needles.

The following Crochet Pattern will create one pair of Crocheted Lace Gloves to fit the
average hand. These gloves will stretch to fit most women’s hands; washing will restore them
to their original size.

Materials:
1-1/2 oz of a fine mercerized crochet cotton (No. 20); Size 7 steel crochet hook; Tubular
elastic to fit around wrists.

Gauge:6 Solomon’s knots to 2″ worked on size 7 steel hook. To save time, take time to check
gauge.

Right-hand glove:
Join length of elastic to fit around wrist. Work 100 sc over elastic and join with a sl st to
first sc.

1st round * Extend loop on hook to a height of approximately 1/4″, yo and draw a loop through
extended loop on hook, insert hook from front to back in the back strand of the loop just
made, yo and draw a loop through, there are now 2 loops on hook, yo and draw through 2 loops
on hook- called 1 Solomon’s knot or 1 SK -, skip next 4 sc, 1 sc in next sc, rep from * 19
more times. Do not turn at end of rounds.

2nd round * 1 SK, inserting hook under 2 top loops only of extended st work 1 sc in next SK
of previous round – called 1 sc top -, rep from * to end.

Last round forms SK pat.

Shape base of thumb

3rd round As 2nd round.

4th round (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in next SK- 1 SK inc made -, * 1 SK, 1 sc top in next SK,
rep from * to end.

5th round As 2nd round.

6th round (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in first SK, (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in 2nd SK, * 1 SK, I sc
top in next SK, rep from * to end.

7th round As 2nd round.

8th round (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in first SK, mark this inc with a colored thread, (1 SK, 1
sc top in next SK) 4 times, (1 SK, 1 sc top) twice in next SK, *1 SK, 1 sc top in next SK,
rep from * to end.

9th-13th rounds As 2nd round.

Divide for thumb

14th round Work in pat to position directly above marked inc, 3 SK, skip next 7 SK, 1 sc top
in next SK, mark last st with a colored thread, *1 SK, 1 sc top in next SK, rep from * to
end.

15th-20th rounds As 2nd round. 20 SK.

Divide for first finger

21st round Work in pat to position directly above marked st, 2 SK, skip next 13 SK, 1 sc top
in next SK.

First finger:
Next round (1 SK, I sc top in next SK) 8 times.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 8 SK until finger measures 3″ from beg or length required.

Next round Ch l, (1 sc top in next SK, ch 1) 8 times.

Next round 1 sc in each of next 8 sc. Fasten off, leaving an end of yarn approx. 8″ long.

Thread yarn through last round and pull tightly to gather.

Secure yarn and cut off close to sts.

Second finger:
Next round With palm facing, rejoin yarn to sc at base of first finger, (1 SK, I sc top in
next SK) twice, 2 SK, skip next 9 SK of last round of palm, 1 sc top in next SK, (1 SK, 1 sc
top in next SK) twice, (1 SK, l sc top in base of first finger) twice.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 8 SK until finger measures 3-1/4″ from beg or

length required.

Complete as for first finger.

Third finger:
Next round With palm facing, rejoin yarn to sc at base of 2nd finger, (1 SK, 1 sc top in next
SK) twice, 2 SK, skip next 5 SK, 1 sc top in next SK, (1 SK, 1 sc top in next SK) twice, (1
SK, 1 sc top in base of 2nd finger) twice.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 8 SK until finger measures 3″ from beg or length required.

Complete as for first finger.

Fourth finger:

Next round With palm facing, rejoin yarn to sc at base of 3rd finger, (1 SK, 1 sc top in next
SK) 5 times, (1 SK, 1 sc top in base of 3rd finger) twice.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 7 SK until finger measures 2-3/4′ from beg or length
required.

Next round Ch 1, (1 sc top in next SK, ch 1) 7 times.

Next round I sc in each of next 7 sc. Fasten off and complete as for first finger.

Thumb
Next round With RS facing, rejoin yarn to sc at right of thumb opening, (1 SK, 1 sc top in
next SK) 7 times, (1 SK, 1 sc in next sc) 3 times across back of thumb opening, (1 SK, 1 sc
top in next SK) 7 times, 1 sc top in next SK, skip next SK-1 SK dec.

Cont. in rounds of SK pat on these 9 SK until thumb measures 2-1/2″ from beg or length
required.

Next round Ch 1, (1 sc top in next SK, ch 1) 9 times.

Next round 1 sc in each of next 9 sc.

Fasten off and complete as for first finger.

Cuff
Turn glove upside-down and, with RS facing, rejoin yarn to elastic between any 2 sc worked
over elastic.

1st round Work 100 sc over elastic, inserting hook between previous sc.

2nd round (2 SK, skip next 3 sc, 1 sc in each of next 2 sc) 20 times.

3rd round (2 SK, 1 sc in knot between 2 SK) 20 times.

4th-6th rounds As 3rd round.

7th round * 1 SK, 7 sc in knot between next 2 SK, rep from * to end, join with a sl st to
first SK. Fasten off.

Left-hand glove
Work palm, fingers and thumb as for right-hand glove, then turn work inside-out.

Work cuff as for right-hand glove.

To Finish:
Weave in all loose ends invisibly and cut close to sts. Do not press.

Spray gloves lightly with water and leave to dry naturally. Lightly spray cuffs with starch.

You can buy ready made crochet gloves online at janeaustengiftshop.co.uk – click here.


These instructions are provided courtesy of Craftown.com. Visit their site for hundreds of other free project ideas.

Purchase your own crocheted gloves from our giftshop, available in
white. Ecru gloves are available from Austentation: Regency
Accessories
.

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Ladies’ Useful Accessories

From Mamma– A Mariner’s compass
From Aunt– A silver Vinagrette
From Augusta– A gold twisted ring
From Miss Ramsey– A leather purse
Emma Austen Leigh, 1815

During the Regency, friends would exchange small gifts at Christmas or Twelfth Night. These tended to be useful items or homemade tokens of remembrance. They might be accompanied by a riddle or short poem, like the needle bag Jane gave to a friend in 1792:

This little bag, I hope, will prove
To be not vainly made;
For should you thread and needles want,
It will afford you aid.

And, as we are about to part,
‘Twill serve another end:
For, when you look upon this bag,
You’ll recollect your friend.

Chatelaine
Chatelaine, 1765-1775 Victoria and Albert Museum no. C.492:1 to 7-1914, Wikimedia Commons

Jane’s neice, Emma Austen Leigh, kept a diary list of all the gifts she was given over a period of years. It included jewelry, purses, knitting boxes and workbags along with a selection of fashionable accessories and mending tools.

The chatelaine is a device which clips to the waist band or belt of a dress for holding such items as the mistress of the house would need with her throughout the day. It might include her seal, watch, scissors, thimble, a vinaigrette, and a key holder.

Chatelaines were worn by men and women and might be made of silver or steel. They could be as plain or as decorated as the owner wished. The term originally meant the mistress of a large estate or Castle and literally means “the keeper of the keys.”

A vinaigrette is a little tightly sealing box with a second pierced lid inside to contain a bit of gauze soaked in vinegar, lavender water, or other scent. Sniffing the contents were meant to revive someone feeling faint or give relief from unpleasant odors. It might be kept inside a reticule or be equipped with a loop and hung about the wearer’s wrist or from a chatelaine. Vinaigrettes were made by silversmiths specializing in boxes so they usually also made snuffboxes. There were smiths in London who did this type of work, but most boxes were made in Birmingham.

Treat your friend to a Georgian style gift at our online shop – click here!

Reprinted with persmission Sharon Wagoner, Curator of The Georgian Index. Visit this site for a historical tour through Regency London!