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If you are reading this page, chances are you have a deep and abiding love for Jane Austen and her works. Like many of our readers, you may also enjoy writing about Jane, be it research about her time period, her life, her novels, or reviews of her works (and those inspired by her works). We love hearing from you, and we love posting articles from Janeites around the globe. If you have a question about a piece posted on our site, or would like to submit your own work for inclusion on this site, please contact Matthew Coniam by email at info@janeaustengiftshop.co.uk. Our website is free and open to the public. The Jane Austen Centre does not offer financial return in exchange for articles. All pieces submitted to the site must be family friendly in nature. Articles submitted for review are not guaranteed to be posted, but we do include as many as we can. When we reprint a piece, we rely on the integrity of the author regarding the work’s originality and accuracy. It is also up to the author to determine if the images they have included are copyright free and able to be reproduced under the creative commons, public domain or fair use doctrine: …the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or (more…)
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Digital Jane: Jane Austen E-books online

In Jane Austen’s day, books were sold in a rather humble state. The pages were removed from the printing press, folded, sewn, and bound in plain paper-covered cardboard, the folds uncut. The owner could then take this embryonic volume and have it bound to suit his own taste and pocketbook: anything from a modest cloth covering to handsome tooled leather and gilt edges. Mr. Darcy had more to do to maintain the family library at Pemberley than simply place an order with a bookseller. Modern readers also have variety in our volumes. We are all familiar with hardback books, as well as the larger trade paperback and smaller mass-market paperback books. Now we have yet another selection: electronic books, or e-books, books in electronic format that can be viewed on a computer screen or a handheld device. The most popular format for e-books is Adobe Acrobat, which have the document extension .pdf (which stands for Portable Document Format). The software to read such documents, called Adobe Acrobat Reader, can be downloaded for free at the Adobe site. The software is popular because it is compatible with Windows, Macintosh, or Unix-based operating systems. There is even a version for the Palm operating system, allowing many users to read .pdf documents on their handheld devices. Microsoft Reader is a proprietary e-book format and the reader is also free to download. You must register for the Microsoft Passport to activate the reader. Microsoft Reader is only available for computers that run Windows 98 (more…)
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Jane Austen On-Line: Begin your Search

In this age of technology and high-speed access, it is possible to find nearly anyone and anything on-line. When a recent internet search using the phrase “Jane Austen” revealed more than 124,000 related websites, it was clear to see that Jane Austen was not only on the web, but there to stay. With literally thousands of sites to choose from – pages created by everyone from novice fans to museums, organizations and official academic research sites, it may be a bit daunting to know where to start. These next four articles will attempt to categorize some of the many websites available profiling this author and review some of the best sites relating to Jane Austen’s biography, her works, Regency fashions and that time period.  One of the most entertaining and certainly the most popular place to start a search for Jane Austen related information is the Republic of Pemberley. This site- or rather, community- was created in 1996 by a small group of hard-core Janeites. Moved to it’s own server in 1998, they have continued to maintain and update a “Haven in a world programmed to misunderstand obsession with things Austen.” They currently run over 20 message boards (on all topics including each of the novels, the movies, history, sequels, advice and the “Bits of Ivory” board- a place to post your own continuations of the books, such as a recent Uppercross Chronicles, detailing the lives of the next generation of Wentworths and Musgroves), a chat room, a widely respected (more…)