Posted on

Jane Austen News – Issue 78

The Jane Austen News is Tilney is top!

What’s the Jane Austen News this week?  

 Jane Austen Money Worth A Mint?

The £10 notes are nearly ready for release to the general public, and given what happened with the £5 notes, it seems likely the The Jane Austen News is that Jane will be on the new £2 coinsame could happen with the new £10 note when it comes to low serial numbers being worth more than their face value.

If you find a note with the serial code beginning ‘AA01’ you may be holding a couple of hundred pounds in your hand – as these numbers are popular with collectors. Another code to hold onto is the ‘AK47’ code notes; some of these on the £5 note have sold for as much as £1,000.

It’s not just notes though.

A new limited edition £2 coin featuring Jane Austen is also being put into circulation. The coin will only be available in a very limited number of places but it can be purchased from the Royal Mint website already. These will be uncirculated coins and can cost between £10 and £825. The bottom line is, if you find a Jane £2 coin, it could be worth a mint!


Mr Tilney – Top Austen Hero

At last, Bustle has given the woefully underrated Mr Henry Tilney his day in the sun. Usually he’s overshadowed by Mr Darcy, but one Austen fan and writer for the online magazine has explained why Henry Tilney deserves far more recognition than he gets as a hero, and is, in her (and some at the Jane Austen News’) opinion, the best of all of Austen’s heroes.

  1. He’s Good-Looking — But Not Too Good-Looking
  2. He’s The Funniest Of Jane Austen’s Heroes
  3. He’s Very Sarcastic
  4. He’s Forgiving
  5. He’s A Good Brother

The list goes on! If you like Mr Tilney, you’ll like Emma’s article which you can read in full here.

“That gentleman would have put me out of patience, had he stayed with you half a minute longer. He has no business to withdraw the attention of my partner from me. We have entered into a contract of mutual agreeableness for the space of an evening, and all our agreeableness belongs solely to each other for that time. Nobody can fasten themselves on the notice of one, without injuring the rights of the other. I consider a country-dance as an emblem of marriage. Fidelity and complaisance are the principal duties of both; and those men who do not choose to dance or marry themselves, have no business with the partners or wives of their neighbours.”

Henry Tilney (talking with tongue firmly in his cheek) on the social etiquette of dancing.


Gyles Brandreth Drowns Mr Darcy

Gyles Brandreth spoke to Foyles booksellers recently about his book loves and book loathes, and it appears that he’s also not the biggest Darcy fan! His reason was not quite we were expecting though…
I loved Mr Darcy. He was devilishly handsome, absurdly arrogant and my idea (everybody’s idea!) of an English romantic hero.
In fact, I realise I must have been fourteen at the time and the reason I loved the novel so much was that I convinced myself that I was Mr Darcy!
And then, at school, we put on a stage version of Pride and Prejudice and I went to the auditions with high hopes and great expectations and – yes, you’ve guessed it – I was cast, not as Mr Darcy, but as the ridiculous, pompous, po-faced, vain and vain-glorious clergyman, Mr Collins. I couldn’t believe it. Half a century on, I still can’t believe it. But from that moment, I turned on Mr Darcy. I had loved him. Now I loathed him. And I’ve loathed him ever since.
He may not like it, but we could imagine Gyles doing rather a good job of Mr Collins! His full Foyles chat can be read here.

Continue reading Jane Austen News – Issue 78

Posted on

After Dinner Mints & Candies

Mint and its various forms have long been used as health aids. John Gerard, author of The Herball (1597) recommends it for everything from a “stomacke” ache to contraception. 200 years later, it was still used to ease discomfort and freshen the breath. No wonder the after dinner mint came into being. One of the oldest commercially produced mints is the Altoid, “The Original Celebrated Curiously Strong Peppermints “. Though now manufactured in many flavors by the American company, Wrigley, they were originally created in the 1780’s by London-based Smith & Company. By the 1800’s they had been incorporated into the Callard & Bowser confection company.

Not everyone could had the means or desire to purchase their peppermint candies. Candy recipes abounded in period cookbooks, like this one from Martha Washington’s Booke of Sweetmeats:

To Make Mint Cakes
Take a pound of sugar finely beaten, & put to it 3 or 4 spoonfulls of mint water, & boyle it up to a candy. The take some mint & shread it small & put it to yr candy and drop it as you did the rose cakes, & set them in ye sun or a stove to dry.

To Make Cakes of Roses
Take roses & cut the whites from them after they are pluckt, then stamp& streyne them with the damask rose water & ye juice of leamons. Then put it in a skillet with as much sugar as your juice will wet. Then set it on a soft fire & let it boyl softly till it be pritty stiff. Then drop it on a plate, & If it stand, it is enough. Then drop it in little cakes and set them in the sun to dry.

A modern recipe for Mint candies can be found here Cooks.com

Enjoyed this article? Browse our Jane Austen Giftshop for recipes and etiquette books!