Posted on

Favourite Austenesque Retellings – Top Ten

an austenesque retellingAlthough nothing can beat reading Jane’s own novels, sometimes it’s nice to read an ‘Austenesque’ story. These can be based on Jane’s novels, a prequel or sequel to them, in the same kind of style… We can’t say for sure what makes a story an Austenesque story, but what we can be sure of is that there are a lot to choose from! In this blog post, Meredith from Austenesque Reviews runs through her recent top ten Austenesque retellings. ***** While many Austenesque stories take place in the Regency era and many take place in modern times, there are a handful that are set somewhere in between. These stories take Jane Austen’s beloved characters and bring them to new time periods and/or settings. Sometimes these stories are referred to as ‘alternate universe,’ but I like to use the term – Retellings. Often times in these stories the setting feels like a character in and of itself. And I love seeing how authors immerse Jane Austen’s characters and the reader in these unique and diverse settings. The amount of Austenesque Retellings (that are not modern-day retellings) published may be small, but many of them are such sensational reads I thought it would be fun to highlight my favorites! Here are 10 fabulous Austenesque retellings that are so deserving of praise and recognition! * These lists are based only on the novels I have read and reviewed and are my top ten favourites. **These lists are subject to change.   *** (in (more…)
Posted on

Jane Austen News – Issue 46

What’s the Jane Austen News this week?   Jane Austen’s Mother Not a Fan of All Her Work…      Mansfield Park is probably Jane’s least popular novel, and it appears that readers of today are not the only ones to hold that opinion. From January 2017 the British Library will put on display Austen’s handwritten notes of what friends, family and correspondents thought of the novel. They’re not all complimentary. Of the documents on display is one which shows that Jane Austen’s mother Cassandra, thought that Mansfield Park was not as good as Pride & Prejudice and found the heroine, Fanny Price, “insipid”. On the upside, Jane’s sister Cassandra was “fond of Fanny” and “delighted much in Mr Rushworth’s stupidity”. That’s not the worst review of Mansfield Park on display though. Other writings of Austen’s show that she recorded the thoughts of a lady called Augusta Bramstone, who thought Sense & Sensibility and Pride & Prejudice “nonsense … but [she] expected to like M.P. better, & having finished the 1st vol. – flattered herself she had got through the worst”. Poor Jane! We can’t help but feel at the Jane Austen News that it’s a little ironic, given these reviews, that Mansfield Park was the novel which made her the most money within her lifetime!  Jane Austen Could Make You £20,000    There was a lot of buzz around the first batch of the Winston Churchill £5 notes which were released back in September, but they’re out now so it would make sense (more…)
Posted on

Certificate of Excellence for the Regency Tea Room

The Regency Tea Room at the Jane Austen Centre earns the 2013 Trip Advisor Certificate of Excellence. Honoured as a Top Performing Tearoom as Reviewed by Travellers on the World’s Largest Travel Site Bath, Uk – The Regency Tea Room at the Jane Austen Centre today announced that it has received a TripAdvisor® Certificate of Excellence award. The accolade, which honours hospitality excellence, is given only to establishments that consistently achieve outstanding traveller reviews on TripAdvisor, and is extended to qualifying businesses worldwide. Only the top-performing 10 per cent of businesses listed on TripAdvisor receive this prestigious award. To qualify for a Certificate of Excellence, businesses must maintain an overall rating of four or higher, out of a possible five, as reviewed by travellers on TripAdvisor, and must have been listed on TripAdvisor for at least 12 months. Additional criteria include the volume of reviews received within the last 12 months. Lenka Winter, the Tea Room Manager is pleased to receive a TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence,” said,“We strive to offer our customers a memorable experience, and this accolade is evidence that our hard work is translating into positive reviews on TripAdvisor.” “TripAdvisor is delighted to celebrate the success of businesses around the globe, from Sydney to Chicago, Sao Paulo to Rome, which are consistently offering TripAdvisor travellers a great customer experience,” said Alison Copus, Vice President of Marketing for TripAdvisor for Business. “The Certificate of Excellence award provides top performing establishments around the world the recognition they deserve, based on (more…)
Posted on

Submit an Article

If you are reading this page, chances are you have a deep and abiding love for Jane Austen and her works. Like many of our readers, you may also enjoy writing about Jane, be it research about her time period, her life, her novels, or reviews of her works (and those inspired by her works). We love hearing from you, and we love posting articles from Janeites around the globe. If you have a question about a piece posted on our site, or would like to submit your own work for inclusion on this site, please contact Matthew Coniam by email at info@janeaustengiftshop.co.uk. Our website is free and open to the public. The Jane Austen Centre does not offer financial return in exchange for articles. All pieces submitted to the site must be family friendly in nature. Articles submitted for review are not guaranteed to be posted, but we do include as many as we can. When we reprint a piece, we rely on the integrity of the author regarding the work’s originality and accuracy. It is also up to the author to determine if the images they have included are copyright free and able to be reproduced under the creative commons, public domain or fair use doctrine: …the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or (more…)
Posted on

An Introduction to Jane Austen Sequels

By Laurel Ann Nattress In the Beginning We know that Jane amused her family with the future life of her characters from her nephew James Edward Austen-Leigh’s biography Jane Austen: A Memoir (1870): “She would, if asked, tell us many little particulars about the subsequent career of some of her people. In this traditionary way we learned that Miss Steele never succeeded in catching the Doctor; that Kitty Bennet was satisfactorily married to a clergyman near Pemberley, while Mary obtained nothing higher than one of her uncle Philips’ clerks, and was content to be considered a star in the society of Meriton; that the “considerable sum”’ given by Mrs. Norris to William Price was one pound; that Mr. Woodhouse survived his daughter’s marriage, and kept her and Mr. Knightley from settling at Donwell, about two years; and that the letters placed by Frank Churchill before Jane Fairfax, which she swept away unread, contained the word “pardon”. Of the good people in Northanger Abbey and Persuasion we know nothing more than what is written: for before those works were published their author had been taken away from us, and all such amusing communications had ceased for ever.” Family Efforts: As early as the 1850’s Jane Austen’s family attempted to complete her unfinished works. Some succeeded. Others did not. Austen’s niece Catherine Anne Hubback (1818-1877), the daughter of her brother Frank, published The Younger Sister: A Novel (T. C. Newby) in 1850. It was based on Austen’s unfinished story The Watsons. Technically, (more…)