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Create A Knitted Shawl

A Knitted Shawl

During the late 18th century, there was a mania for anything vaguely Oriental. This lead to the popularity of turbans, shawls and exotic jewelry. Few of these creations lasted more than a few seasons, with the exception of shawls which served a practical purpose (The Empress Josephine had between 300-400 shawls in her wardrobe!*). Imported from India or the East, the best shawls were made of such luxurious materials as cashmere or silk, but the English manufacturers soon produced cheap copies in serge, wool, cotton, lace, and even rabbit fur. Popular shapes included the rectangle, square (folded in half) and the triangle.


A perfect first shawl, and it uses less than one skein of luxurious Handmaiden Sea Silk yarn! Quick to knit with an easy-to-memorize lace pattern. Finish with knotted fringe for a truly elegant look.

Difficulty level

Simple

Size

68 x 25″ [170 x 62 cm], after blocking

Materials

Handmaiden Sea Silk (70% silk/30% Seacell, 438 yd [400 m] per 100 g), color Rose Garden, 1 skein

US 9 [5.5 mm] circular needle, 32″ [80 cm] long

4 stitch markers
Yarn needle

Gauge

1 pattern repeat = 2.5″ [6.25 cm] wide x 2″ [5 cm] long, after blocking

Pattern

Note: Pattern is mirrored on either side of the center stitch. Chart should be read right to left on right half of shawl, and left to right on left half of shawl on every row. The leftmost stitch of each row on the chart is the shawl’s center stitch.

Cast on 7 sts.
Row 1 (RS): Knit.
Row 2: K2, purl to last 2 sts, k2.
Row 3: K2, (yo, k1) 3 times, yo, k2—11 sts.
Row 4: Rep Row 2.
Row 5: K2, yo, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, yo, k2—15 sts.
Row 6: Rep Row 2.
Row 7: K2, yo, k5, yo, k1, yo, k5, yo, k2—19 sts.
Row 8: Rep Row 2.
Row 9: K2, yo, k7, yo, k1, yo, k7, yo, k2—23 sts.
Row 10: Rep Row 2.
Row 11: K2, yo, k1, place marker, *(k2tog, yo twice, k2tog) twice*, place marker, yo, k1 (center stitch of shawl), yo, place marker, work from * to * once more, place marker, k1, yo, k2.
Row 12: K2, p2, sl marker, *k2, p1, k3, p1, k1*, slip marker, purl to next marker, slip marker, *k1, p1, k3, p1, k2*, slip marker, p2, k2.
Row 13: K2, yo, k2, sl marker, *k2, k2tog, yo twice, k2tog, k2*, sl marker, k1, (yo, k1) twice, sl marker, work from * to * once more, sl marker, k2, yo, k2.
Row 14: K2, p3, sl marker, *k4, p1, k3*, sl marker, purl to next marker, sl marker, *k3, p1, k4*, sl marker, p3, k2.
Row 15: K2, yo, k3, sl marker, *(k2tog, yo twice, k2tog) twice*, sl marker, k2, yo, k1, yo, k2, sl marker, work from * to * once more, sl marker, k3, yo, k2.
Row 16: K2, p4, sl marker, *k2, p1, k3, p1, k1*, sl marker, purl to next marker, sl marker, *k1, p1, k3, p1, k2*, sl marker, p4, k2.
Row 17: K2, yo, k4, sl marker, *k2, k2tog, yo twice, k2tog, k2*, sl marker, k3, yo, k1, yo, k3, sl marker, work from * to * once more, sl marker, k4, yo, k2.
Row 18: K2, p5, sl marker, *k4, p1, k3*, sl marker, purl to next marker, sl marker, *k3, p1, k4*, sl marker, p5, k2.

After row 18, the first repeat of the lace pattern is complete. Move the stitch markers at the ends to 3 sts from edge and the markers in the middle to either side of the center stitch. This adds 8 sts to each side of the shawl. Repeat rows 11-18, working 2 repeats of the pattern (highlighted in pink on the chart, between asterisks in the text) on each side of the center stitch. Once that repeat is complete, move the stitch markers as before and continue (working 3 repeats of the pattern on each side of the center stitch). Continue as established until there are 14 repeats of the pattern on each side of the center stitch, or 122 rows.

Edging: Work loosely 4 rows garter st.

Bind off VERY loosely.

Finishing

Weave in ends. Block to specified measurements. Allow to dry completely.



Reprinted with permission from Magknits: Your Friendly Online Knitting Magazine. Amy Polcyn is a knitwear designer whose work has appeared in Knitter’s, Knit n’ Style, Creative Knitting, Cast On, several yarn company collections, knitting books, and online.


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Spencers, Shawls, Pelisses and More

Lady's Monthly Museum (1804)<br /> Thanks to Kathy Hammel for this fashion plate image.<br /> A pink sarcenet Spencer, open in front: sleeves made very full, and trimmed with lace round the hands

Regency Outerwear

By Kathy Hammel

“If I thought it would not tempt her to go out in sharp winds, and grow coarse, I would send her a new hat and pelisse.”
Sir Walter Elliot
Persuasion

Lady's Monthly Museum (1804)<br />
Thanks to Kathy Hammel for this fashion plate image.<br />
A pink sarcenet Spencer, open in front: sleeves made very full, and trimmed with lace round the hands

In 1799, as the 18th Century was quietly taking its last breath and the craze was for all things classical, the spencer and pelisse were making their debut. The spencer– a close-fitting, tight sleeved, waist length jacket modeled on a gentleman’s riding coat, but without tails– is said to be the invention of one Lord Spencer. While references agree that Lord Spencer inadvertently engendered the style through a mishap; what exactly the mishap was, however, is not generally agreed upon. It seems the gentleman in question either had the tails torn from his riding coat when he fell from his horse or had them singed off after he backed too close to the fire while warming himself. Either way, Lord Spencer apparently found the tail-less riding coat to his liking and instructed his tailor to make him several more in the same style. It wasn’t long before the fair sex took up the style (note 1) — the bottom of the jacket raised to match the high waists of the current fashion– and a Regency classic was born. Continue reading Spencers, Shawls, Pelisses and More