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Parbake & Prose: Making Mr Bingley’s soup

Parbake & Prose is a project created by sibling bibliophile and chef team, Daniella Rossi and Eric Upper.

The concept is pretty simple: Parbake & Prose takes a look at great works of literature, from Greek epic poems to modern classics, and creates recipes based on the dishes in them. Daniella lives in London and is a committed bibliophile, having studied languages and literature at New York University and receiving a doctorate from the University of Cambridge. After graduation, she spent years working at one of the world’s oldest rare book specialists in London. So books are her thing. Eric lives in New York. He studied at the French Culinary Institute there, and has chefed at Michelin-star restaurants including Charlie Palmer’s Aureole and Joël Robuchon in Las Vegas. He is currently working on a restaurant startup in NYC. Eric creates the recipes.

The blog explores intriguing books with important food references that help to either progress the storyline, showcase character development or reveal history. Then it provides a step-by-step recipe and cooking guide so you can recreate each dish. Eric and Daniella spend hours conceiving and testing the recipes and balance staying as true as possible to the literary reference with the tastiness of the end product.

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Regency White Soup

“As for the ball, it is quite a settled thing; and as soon as Nicholls has made white soup enough I shall send round my cards.”
Charles Bingley, Pride and Prejudice

Wilma Paterson, author of “The Regency Cookbook” relates that, “regency white soup is a very old recipe. As a delicate veal broth, it was made in Scotland as soup-a-la-reine, a remainder of the ‘Auld Alliance’ between Scotland and France. A more elaborate version, Lorraine soup (possibly a corruption of La Reine) it appeared frequently on fashionable dinner and supper menus during the Regency.” White Soup seems to have been made from veal or chicken stock (broth), egg yolks, ground almonds and cream. Served with negus* (hot sweetened wine and water) they were warming and intoxicating beverages at balls. Continue reading Regency White Soup